Social Security Change In Information Letter


Overview
- This Social Security Change in Information Letter is used by someone to notify the Social Security Administration of material changes in his or her situation.  The material change in this circumstance is a change which may affect the person's receipt of social security benefits.  
- The Social Security Act is a federal statute which provides supplemental income to the retired, the disabled, or the survivors of a person who was covered by the act.  
- Once an individual is receiving benefits from the Social Security Administration, he or she must keep the administration updated on their circumstances.  
- The types of changes that could affect the continued receipt of benefits are: the recipient's change of address; any change in the recipient's finances such as employment, earnings, or inheritance; the birth or adoption of a child; or a name change of the recipient.

When You Need It
- When you need to update your information for the Social Security Administration.


Getting Started

You will need:
- The old and new addresses and telephone number(s) of the beneficiaries
- Information that affects income, earnings of governmental benefits.
- Any changes in the beneficiaries name as a result of divorce or marriage.
- Birth certificate/adoption decree.
- Information about changes in child custody and the names of all children involved.
- New and old direct deposit account numbers belonging to the beneficiary.
- Information on the beneficiary if they are imprisoned, are institutionalized, have left the country (including dates of departure and return).
- Names and addresses of deceased beneficiaries and any dependants who might be receiving their checks
- Name of person(s) managing the funds.

When to Review and Revise
- When the beneficiary has had changes in residence, name, marital status, income, earnings or governmental benefits, child custody or has given birth or adopted.
- If the beneficiary has become incarcerated or institutionalized, died, departed the United States, changed financial institutions or become incapable of managing his/her affairs.